11th Annual Clay International

Workhouse Arts Center Clay International exhibition represents the depth and breadth of contemporary functional and sculptural ceramic artworks being created throughout the country. Ceramic artist Kevin Snipes juried over 170 images to select 50 pieces of which incorporate a contemporary spirit as well as technical skill in the material. The show is an exciting opportunity to see a variety of style and technique which encompass the field of contemporary ceramic arts.

The exhibit is on view at the Workhouse Arts Center Vulcan Gallery from August 7, 2021 – October 10, 2021. The gallery is currently open Thursday, Friday and Saturday 11:00am – 5:00pm and Sunday Noon – 5:oopm.

Jurors’ Statement:

Studio Talk with Lisa G. Westheimer

Studio Talk with Stephanie Lanter

Studio Talk with Shannon M. Brownlee

Studio Talk with Kourtney Stone

Studio Talk with James Klueg

Studio Talk with Eric Ordway

Studio Talk with Diane Brown

Studio Talk with Chris Leonard

Studio Talk with Chris Corson

Studio Talk with Alice Abrams

Studio Talk with Eunkyung Han

Studio Talk with Susan King

Studio Talk with Benjamin Lambert

Artists and Artist Statements

For purchase inquiries, please contact Gallery Manager, Audrey Miller at audreymiller@workhousearts.org or (703) 584-2911.

Alice Abrams – Lady with Long neck
(Massachussetts)

2020
Stoneware, hand built coils, high fired soda kiln
16 in x 7 in x 11 in
$900
I made this during the height of the Covid lockdown, while immersed in news about George Floyd, and the national angst of our political divisiveness and pandemic crisis. I yearned for unity and peace. She just kind of appeared, as if she had said, “Blend me into everyone, universal in my skin color, I am all of us together.”

Amber Aguirre – Crash
(Hawaii)

2021
Porcelain, Cone 6 fired, Naked Fauxku
7 in x 14 in x 8 in
$400
This piece came about as my daughter was diagnosed with a brain tumor. It expresses the feelings I had at the time. The human condition is such that you don’t know what can happen at any time. Things can be flying along just fine until there is a sudden crash. You may die, or you may survive.

Sharon Bastin – Mother’s Love
(Florida)

2019
Porcelain raku (on wood base)
20 in x 14 in x 14 1/2 in
$800
The grace and beauty of a mothers’ love for her children is extraordinary. Whether in nature or in the human world the dedication to ensuring strength and healthy upbringing of her child is enduring and a moment of pride and sadness as they head out into the uncertain world. Inspired by my own daughter going out into the world this piece reflects the love and sadness of that moment. Porcelain raku with the white crackle glaze made this piece a risky proposition from start to finish much like how I felt sending her off to college.

Sharon Bastin – Playful Sea Otter
(Florida)

2020
Porcelain raku (on slate base with seaweed)
4 1/2 in x 9 in x 9 1/5 in
$650
The playful sea otter is a double edged sword like many things in life or even people. The adorable and playful nature makes the viewer want to get close to admire them but be careful of those teeth. I work primarily in porcelain and raku fire for the spontaneous coloring it gives. Inspiration for the work from the woods or water is ongoing and the risk and reward of porcelain and raku fuels my creativity while keeping and unexpected and somewhat uncontrolled experience like nature itself.

Shannon Blakey – Missing Pieces
(Missouri)

2020
Porcelain, oxidation firing
4 3/4 in x 8 in x 7 1/2 in
$190
In this work specifically, it was my interest to combine water lines from my own home along with fragments from reclaimed chunks of nature in order to show the cyclical order of one action to another. In creating this work I was interested in processing my my own role within the larger whole. It is my hope that the work created is both something visually interesting and texturally compelling; something that would prompt someone to look, but eventually draw them to touch the work and question why certain decisions were made.

Melissa Bland – Two Suns Bowl
(Massachussetts)

2020
Dark stoneware, cone 10 reduction fired
3 1/8 in x 5 1/4 in x 5 1/4 in
$90
I live in a different world from most because I suffer from severe chronic pain. The thought of living in two worlds led to the conception of two suns. The motif belies its dark underpinnings.

Tara Booth – Always Watching
(Missouri)

2020
Black stoneware, cone 6 oxidation fired
8 in x 7 in x 6 in
$500
How many eyes are too many eyes?

Sally Brogden – Untitled 1
(Tennessee)

2019
Porcelain
25 in x 5 in x 5 in
$800
My work focuses on simple abstract form. I am fascinated with the associations that we make as we interpret the world around us, and I create objects with broad and ambiguous references. My works draw on references to human form, to nature, and to mass-produced objects.

Sally Brogden – Untitled 2
(Tennessee)

2019
Porcelain
25 in x 5 in x 5 in
$800
My work focuses on simple abstract form. I am fascinated with the associations that we make as we interpret the world around us, and I create objects with broad and ambiguous references. My works draw on references to human form, to nature, and to mass-produced objects.

Diane Marks Brown – POP, POP, POP, POP, POP
(Illinois)

2021
Porcelain, cone 6 slow cooled oxidation fired
21 in x 8 in x 5 1/2 in
$1,000
At a critical moment in climate change, we are reliant on the natural world, respecting the physical world and being aware of the imbalance of natural forces in our daily life. My work is about the evolution of plants spreading their seeds and the influences of the natural world on my growth. Seed dispersal informs how effectively, slow the renewal of plant life is. Sturdy seeds are resilient while being dependent on wind, water, fire, and earth. Displaying this balance by arranging the seedpods in tenuous positions with repetition shows the slow seed dispersal randomly traveling to their renewal.

Shannon M Brownlee – Maui’s Fishhook
(Washington, DC)

2021
Stoneware woodfired in soda/salt chamber
12 in x 8 in diameter
$300
This is a funerary pot made with my father in mind. I was born and raised in Honolulu and often use the images of the islands and the legends I learned as a child as inspiration. The folk hero Maui was said to have pulled the islands up from the bottom of the sea with his magic fishhook so this pot is topped with his hook.

Bob Bruch – Surge
(Ohio)

2021
Ceramic stoneware, Cone 6 oxidation fired in electric kiln
12 in x 12 in x 9 in
NFS
In developing my asymmetrical work, I am guided by the interaction of volume and line in making each piece. My apparently random, coil-built constructions result from variances introduced at the base during the initial phase of my hand-building process. From these slight modifications in the base upon which I coil-build each form, a uniquely organic – yet “predetermined” – shape emerges. As my construction begins to close in along the top of each vessel, I introduce a more deliberate line (edge) in finishing the piece. The tension and dialogue this edge creates between line and volume tells a story.

Bob Bruch – Waterfall
(Ohio)

2019
Ceramic stoneware, Cone 6 oxidation fired in electric kiln
12 in x 12 in x 9 in
NFS
In developing my asymmetrical work, I am guided by the interaction of volume and line in making each piece. My apparently random, coil-built constructions result from variances introduced at the base during the initial phase of my hand-building process. From these slight modifications in the base upon which I coil-build each form, a uniquely organic – yet “predetermined” – shape emerges. As my construction begins to close in along the top of each vessel, I introduce a more deliberate line (edge) in finishing the piece. The tension and dialogue this edge creates between line and volume tells a story.

Christopher Corson – Medusa Pig Head of Capitalism
(Maryland)

2020
Stoneware, iron oxide; electric fired
22 in x 10 in x 10 in
$2,000
Most of my ceramic work explores the human condition as expressed in the human form. My figures are quiet, introspective and, I hope, universal. But the hate-filled rhetoric of the last election cycle pushed me to make protest work. I channeled my anger into a series of pieces with overt messages about terrible problems not being addressed. For these works, I adapted the ancient form of the stele, a public monument combining an inscribed architectural base with sculptural elements to embody the message. The series currently stands at seven and will continue. This one is about unregulated capitalism.

Nicolas Darcourt – Wall Tableaux Series, Longacress Fields
(Minnesota)

2021
Red stoneware, underglaze, glaze, cone 5 oxidation
16 in x 18 in x 2 1/2 in
$2,000
It seems as though we are surrounded by a psychological landscape of accumulating information constructed of sporadic cultural significance, manufacturing, progress, and development; clarity defined by the ambiguities of excess. If one chooses to take a mental inventory of the parts I use, they may notice architecture, machined parts, ornamentation, biological forms, and non-descript objects. The work reads as both a cross section of layered societal detritus, and a failed attempt at organized narrative. The power of conclusions cannot help but belong to the viewer, and the shifting meaning only exists because there is someone attempting to interpret it.

Ginny Delgado-Loving – A Moment Caught Forever There
(Virginia)

2020
Recycled clay, raku firing; heirloom jacket
6 in x 9 in x 15 in
NFS
In 2020 the modern Plague doctor visited. The world collectively held its breath as the ghastly specter of past plagues loomed over humanity becoming horrifically normalized. For some, Covid changed nothing. Masks and measures were merely temporary inconveniences. For others, Covid became a bifurcation from normal life. Within a year, the trajectory of all our lives changed. Some lives resumed normalcy… others left waiting for a resumption of lives, for the return, loved ones, some waiting forever. Daily reminders. The ever-present mask. The jacket of a beloved waiting to be used. The routine horror and disruption. The year that wasn’t.

Louise Deroualle – Coberta de Nuvens 1
(Colorado)

2021
Mid range stoneware, cone 6 electric fired
10 in x 5 1/2 in x 1 1/4
$550
Like a blanket that covers the body and gives warmth, the floating clouds outside my window bring me comfort and relief. They are formless, limitless and constantly in motion. They are free. I find connection and a sense of belonging by looking out and up to these ethereal formations. Touched by light, they frequently change colors; touched by wind they are always evolving and transforming. Clouds give me peace and perspective. They make the uncertain more bearable.

Louise Deroualle – Coberta de Nuvens 3
(Colorado)

2021
Mid range stoneware, cone 6 electric fired
10 in x 5 1/2 in x 1 1/4
$550
Like a blanket that covers the body and gives warmth, the floating clouds outside my window bring me comfort and relief. They are formless, limitless and constantly in motion. They are free. I find connection and a sense of belonging by looking out and up to these ethereal formations. Touched by light, they frequently change colors; touched by wind they are always evolving and transforming. Clouds give me peace and perspective. They make the uncertain more bearable.

Meg Dickerson – Cuffs
(Maryland)

2020
Mid-range stoneware, electric fired, multiple firings at varying temperatures
10 1/4 in x 10 1/4 in x 2 1/2 in
NFS
This piece was inspired by the restraints many of us feel in this world, particularly now. the work was made with a groggy stoneware. each cuff was formed using an old wooden block. before heading to the kiln, layers of glazes were applied. my methods are uncomplicated. texturing and brushwork is influenced by my attraction to the tribal art and architecture of West Africa. these often-ancient designs are both spare and complex, functional and beautiful. although quiet, this work adds a curious and powerful presence in someone’s home.

Michael Dika – Inside Out
(Delaware)

2020
Underglaze cone 6 electric fired, cone 6 raku fired
6 1/2 in x 6 in x 6 in
NFS
I poeticize clay metaphorically, as clay is mutated and abstracted to explore the complexities of the political construct of identity and state of double consciousness. As an immigrant familiarizing myself in the United States, still trying to find balance. Stability, precarity, dichotomy looms large in my sculptures. I hope to translate the feelings of fragility, vulnerability and exhaustion into forms that create an awareness of oneself yet, just as a vessel occupying a space in time.

Ruth Douzinas – Corroded Panel
(New York)

2021
Stoneware, cone 6 electric fired
17 in x 15 in x 1 1/2 in
$1,500
I am drawn to where the manmade and natural worlds collide – and what happens when nature starts to reclaim the built environment. The push and pull of forces – biology and weather versus metal and concrete – create a unique beauty.

Mari Emori – Verdant
(California)

2018
Sculpture clay, cone 6 oxidation
25 in x 17 in x 17 in
NFS
Water Drop Series emerged as a metaphor for life and the environment. It symbolizes the importance water plays in our lives and in our environment. California, where I reside, has been suffering from severe drought for the past several years. I was inspired by the striking blue sky and breath-taking clouds that I saw after a rainstorm in early spring. Without water, the environment depicted in “Verdant” could not exist.

Oxana Geets – Black Priest of the White Triangle Cult
(Russia)

2021
Stoneware, electric kiln fired
13 3/4 in x 8 5/8 in x 4 3/4 in
NFS
The Black Priest holds a white triangle and performs a ritual dedicated to the aspiration of underground creatures for light. The combination of static and eternal stoneware and movable dancing curls of smoke creates a metaphor of ephemeral variability and rapid change of life meanings, unfolding against the background of the unshakable and incomprehensible heritage of the Past. The composition includes the tripod burner and a backflow incense.

Eunkyung Han – Walk in the Woods
(Maryland)

2021
Stoneware and porcelain, cone 10 reduction firing
6 1/2 in x 6 in x 6 in
$350
Hot tea makes people feel warm, restful and relaxed. This pandemic needs more relaxation for every person and everywhere. This year I started focusing on throwing teapots and trying to give a little special figure to every teapot. For this teapot has a unique twisted handle. This teapot and mug were fired Cone 10 Reduction with two kinds of glazes. Barium blue sprayed over reitz green and it produced tiny spotted bubble on the surface. Everyday hot tea will give you a comfort.

Adriane Honerbrink – Time and Decay
(Mississippi)

2021
Stoneware, salt fired
14 in x 4 in x 27 in
$650
This current body of work came from an investigation on how to communicate the many transitions of loss. After the passing of my mother last year, I was fixated on water and how we all interact with water just as we all interact with death. In Time and Decay, the salt-fired process gave that loss of control which is often felt in the loss of a loved one. The sgraffito filagree and flourishing has been used as a reminder for myself that even in loss, there is a silver lining where joy can be accessed.

Susan King – Not in Our Stars
(Virginia)

2020
Standard 181, twice bisque fired to 06, black oxide base color, acrylic and watercolor cold finish following second bisque
7 in x 6 in x 5 in
$390
“Not in Our Stars” is based on two things: the famous quote by Caesar addressing human frailty in Shakespeare’s play, and how when I’m troubled, I find contemplating the night sky gives me both perspective and comfort. Some find considering the vastness of the universe, and our merest fraction of existence by comparison daunting. For me it is a source of ongoing wonder and deep joy. Visually this piece draws its inspiration from a vacation in Death Valley with its fascinating rock forms, and the stunning night skies seen camping off of Tioga Pass in Yosemite.

James Klueg – Tribal
(Minnesota)

2019
Buff earthenware with overglaze sgraffito
14 in x 9 in x 5 in
$1,200
My pots show my interest in the interaction of the two kinds of sign that are text and visual images. My technical working method is to prepare digitally-composed images and text, but through projection, hand-transcribe it, so that ultimately the surface has a warmer feel. Both my process of building surface and my conceptual process happen in layers. I cultivate the idea that my work should have both more obviously accessible aspects, and richer meanings or relationships to savor should I be successful in persuading the viewer to follow me there.

Benjamin Lambert – The Fox Went Out on a chilly Night
(Ohio)

2021
Stoneware, cone 5 oxidation fired
24 in x 16 in x 12 in
$3,000
Nursery rhymes, biblical narratives, elements of polluted lake shores and contemporary imagery describe an overwhelmed scene. Referencing Judith and Holofernes, and The Fox Went out on a chilly night, this wall piece alludes notions of predator and prey, revenge, the uncanny, and outrage at the state of media communication, society, and environment.

Stephanie Lanter – Negative Space
(Connecticut)

2019
Stoneware, salt fired
11 1/2 in x 18 in x 8 in
$2,000
Currently, my work investigates the slippery condition of language, technology, and epistemology through sculpturally manifesting words, phrases and symbols. Utilizing an analog 3-d printing process, or manually slip trailing, I trace and obsessively retrace to build ambiguous, personally significant terms with liquid porcelain, facilitating the evolution of virtual thought into visceral object. As in the one-ear-to-another, whispered telephone game, these pieces are fragmented, improvised, and slow journeys with meandering destinations. Though referencing topography, their layered lines do not describe locations, but the travel across the terrain of human connection — inevitably turbulent, yet ever full of nuance, power, and possibility.

Annie Rhodes Lee – History is Now and Us
(South Carolina)

2020
Cone 5 electric fired, glazes, underglazes, stains, pastel
23 in x 16 in x 14 in
NFS
While watching the news I sketch and photograph people, always drawn to one particular person in a scene. These portraits form the composition of History Is Now And Us, where emotions shift from story to story, reflecting our times. The concrete block frequently appears as rubble or shelter, partition or protection, and forms a framework where the individual narratives emerge, merge into a whole.

Chris Leonard -Polarizing Pastorale – OH OH or HO HO
(Texas)

2022
Terra Cotta Tile with incision, stamps, and underglaze and glazes, Electric fired, Cone 04
32 in x 32 in
$795
What I want is a smile on the face, a twinkle in the eye, a healthy glow in the gut, and maybe even a friend to confide in. If I don’t have these things, I’ve decided to make them. Much of my current work seems to explore boundaries; when does the positive connotation of universal optimism morph into the over the top proud to be an American where at least I know I’m free to engage in the addiction and fixation on the pursuit of more consumable short-term solutions? Whatever you’ve got, I want, if only for a little while.

Carol Long – Mary and Carol Trap a Peacock
(Kansas)

2019
Mix fired cone 5 oxidation
11 in x 9 in x 11 in
$2,000
My narrative pieces strive to show nature’s beauty in action with a bit of whimsy and a splash of exhilaration. The subject matter is as simple as innocent fun that turns into a valuable learning experience, to survival through defense or offense. I use a white mid temperature clay body fired to cone 5 oxidation. Pieces are made by a variety of methods; such as throwing, slab work, extrusions, hand building, and slip casting. Depth is added through elaborate slip application, staining and glazing. This brings organic unity to the finished piece.

Jon McMillan – Cumulus
(Virginia)

2020
Earthenware, multiple glaze firings to cones 2 and 4
30 in x 70 in x 5 in (installed)
NFS
Wall based sculptures that contrast natural forms (cloud formations, plant life, geography) with elements taken from the built environment. These works explore human kind’s relationship with nature. Hand built earthenware, multiple glaze firings.

Donte Moore – Boundless Thoughts
(Pennsylvania)

2021
Cone 10 porcelain, reduction fired
29 in x 14 in x 14 in
$3,000
Defining who we are as individuals is an everlasting struggle. Once intended to enhance the world and simply our lives, modern machines are constantly transforming human behavior, distancing us from one another, distorting reality through a constant need for machine interaction. Machines problem solve, manufacture and think for our society, Reliance on machine made products controls our daily lives influencing our decisions, our fundamental behaviors, and set the standards for the way we live. Undeniably, my work is influenced by machine perfection, sometimes falling short of the handmade quality, the beauty of imperfection, the human quality.

Eric Ordway – Lilleberge Vessel
(Missouri)

2020
Stonewre, Gas Reduction, Cone 10
24 in x 18 in x 6 in
$700
The form of this work is inspired by a Viking plaque from the Lilleberge burial site. The work is based on reflections on family stories and history.

Bethany Panhorst – Breath
(Kansas)

2021
Slip dip, cone 6 reduction
12 in 10 in x 2 3/4 in
$450
Ceramic and wood sculpture, Breath, explores life and death by portraying the interior bronchi structure of the lungs. Slip-dipped baby’s breath flowers were used to construct the bronchi because of the plant’s delicate branching structure and association with purity. Breath is closely associated with life. The decayed look of this piece suggests a corruption of life.

Bethany Panhorst – Clothed Grass
(Kansas)

2021
Porcelain, cone 6 electric fired
1 1/2 in x 3 3/4 in x 10 in
$550
In Clothed Grass, humanity is compared to grass which for a time flourishes in the field, but quickly withers. By this comparison, the piece conveys life’s brevity. This piece additionally explores neediness through the reference of the title to the Gospel of Matthew. In which, Jesus is recorded saying that the God who clothes the grass of the field with the splendor of the flowers will also care for human life. The needs of humanity can be understood to extend beyond physical well-being to the intangible inward person, which needs to be clothed not in fabric, but moral wholeness.

Jasmine Peck – Self Portrait
(California)

2021
Low-fire white clay, electric oxidation
17 in x 24 in x 24 in
NFS
My creative practice is an intersection of material studies and sculptural ceramics. I utilize the human body as a site for exploration of cultural norms, bodily functions, and ideals around beauty and the grotesque. I am searching for the boundaries of the body: where does the inside stop being the inside? I investigate our internal commonalities, the organs we share. I transform materials such as fabric, yarn, thread, and rugs into protruding viscera and textured membranes. The absurdity of my forms alleviate an anxiety about being a body. I combat abjection through humorous lumps and celebrate our bodies.

Reginald Pointer – Repairing a Broken Union
(Washington, D.C.)

2020
Stoneware Oxidation
16 in x 14 in x 2 in
$400
This work addresses the challenges that we as a nation face when confronting the term united’. Can there be true unity in a broken state? No history or stone should be left unturned. The broken edges acknowledge that this is but a part of the story. We are all part of the story of America and no one side can tells it all. But we can put it all together if a effort is made that embraces our differences.

Sonia Simoun – Conversation in Yellow
(Massachussetts)

2021
Stoneware, Soda-fired
12 in x 11 in x 7 in
$1,400
On the line between life and art, ceramic objects move fluidly between form and function. My work exploits this dichotomy while pushing it to its edge, using the formal language of the domestic object to explore ideas of fracture and fissure, inside and outside, and the ways that craft relates to the architectural and the monumental. Embodying the form of the familiar functional object, I use the language of architecture to push past this simple functionality, in order to achieve new understanding of every-day objects and their relationship to our complex lives.

Jessica Smith – Band
(Alabama)

2021
Porcelain, cone 6 oxidation fired
8 in x 7 in x 9 in
$525
My sculptures are made up of many clay gummy bears that have been scored and slipped together. I find endless fascination in making sense of sculptural space that explores stacking, weaving, and structure.

Jessica Smith – Orbit
(Alabama)

2021
Stoneware, cone 6 oxidation fired
8 in x 9 in x 9 in
$575
My sculptures are made up of many clay gummy bears that have been scored and slipped together. I find endless fascination in making sense of sculptural space that explores stacking, weaving, and structure.

Carol Snyder – Winter Glaze
(Ohio)

2021
Southern Ice porcelain, cone 10 oxidation
4 5/8 in x 5 1/4 in x 5 1/4 in
$900
Wheelthrown high fired porcelain using only the white of the porcelain to convey texture and patterning. Hand shaved and wire brushed leatherhard to emphasize translucency. Inspired by a meditative moment along a quiet and icy treeline in winter.

Kourtney Stone – Between what I know and what I don’t- Bradford
(Pennsylvania)

2020
Low-fire weathernware, electric fired
12 in x 14 in x 8 in
$1,200
My sculptures are meditations on the nature of memory and how we construct stories about our lived experiences. With this portrait, I contemplate what little I actually know about my paternal great-grandfather, the expanse of what I don’t know about him, and the space in between these things. Starting with an old family photograph, I sculpted only what I actually truly know, which are the pixels of that image. From the other perspectives, the viewer encounters the spaces where information was unavailable based on the photo.

Phyllis Kudder Sullivan – Water Arc
(New York)

2019
Colored Stoneware, stains; Cone 6 fired in electric kiln
84 in x72 in x 36 in
$4,000
Interlacing is the undercurrent theme in all my “woven” sculptures. The work is multi-referential with connections to nature, animal structures, the work of women, and fractal geometry. Since 2018 I’ve turned my attention to water, and in particular, rivers. In my Water Series I captures the fluidity and constant movement of flowing water.

John Tobin – Sitting Atop This Funny World
(Virginia)

2021
Recycled stoneware clay, underglaze, plastic, wood, cone 4 oxidation
17 1/2 in x 10 in x 10 in
$795
A lighthearted look at our follies and triumphs, trying to see the world as a better, more fun, place.

Barbara Weidell – Adharcach
(Oklahoma)

2019
Black Mountain sculpture clay, electric oxidation cone 10 fired
18 in x 9 1/2 in x 12 in
$2,000
Adharcach is Irish for “horned” as I researched the gods and goddesses of the Celtic Pantheon I fell upon the horned god lord of the animals. This is one of my interpretations of that god.

Lisa G Westheimer – Covid Nation
(New Jersey)

2020
Raku fired stoneware with painted fused glass inclusions
7 in x 8 in x 6 in
$1,500
I created “Covid Nation” in honor of all of the health care workers who worked so tirelessly during the pandemic to save as many lives as possible against incredible odds and to acknowledge the huge physical and emotional toll it took on them, especially while the federal government and their media outlets played down the virus, alternately suggesting it was a hoax and minimizing its severity, eschewing masks and decrying the medical profession’s warnings and suggestions to contain its spread.

Jessica Wilson – Lasyers Series, Teapot
(Tennessee)

2021
Porcelain, cone 10 reduction fired, decals
5 1/2 in x 8 1/2 in x 5 1/2 in
NFS
We as human beings are composed of layers, manifested through time as we grow and develop in life. Our “human layers” can be likened to the layers of surface built up on the walls of an old home. Some layers covered and hidden, some revealed through wear, age, and time. In my current body of work, I strive to show these layers through the use of multiple surface treatments from pre-firing to post firing, including resists, underglaze, sandblasting, decaling, and lustering.

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