Glass National 2020

The Workhouse Arts Center is proud to present the 6th Annual Workhouse Glass National Exhibition.

This exhibition represents the depth and breadth of contemporary functional and sculptural glass artworks being created throughout the country.  Our juror, Wesley Mountain Glass Arts, juried over 90 images of glass art to select 24 pieces of art which incorporate a contemporary spirit as well as a technical mastery of the material.  The show is a rare opportunity to see a variety of styles and techniques which encompass the field of contemporary glass arts.

Juror’s Statement:

“It was an honor to be selected as a juror for the Workhouse Glass National. With Mountain Glass Arts being the premier lampwork supplier, we have the privilege of working with a very diverse group of artists, and it is always incredibly interesting and rewarding to see some of the work that we facilitate with our service and materials.

The pieces reviewed for this show exhibit a wide range of technique, concept and emotion. All had their merits, making it very difficult to make our selections. In addition, not being able to view the actual pieces likely further removed us from the impact of some of the work. With this in mind, the pieces selected were those that we were able to relate to through the photographs. Color and patterns that caught our eye were more appealing than those requiring more interpretation.

Congratulations to all of the artists that submitted, and especially those selected. We look forward to seeing the final winners and hope to see more from all of these talented artists.” – Mountain Glass Arts

Founded in 2002, Mountain Glass Arts, Inc. is the nation’s premier borosilicate glass supply company and was founded by glass artists with the goal of supplying the highest level of customer satisfaction in the industry. Mountain Glass Arts, Inc. is located in Asheville, North Carolina and currently ships worldwide. We look forward to serving you and hope you will give us the opportunity to do so, please call if you have any questions (800)310-8588. 

Studio Talk with John Cowgill

Artists and Artist Statements

For purchase inquiries, please contact Gallery Manager, Audrey Miller at audreymiller@workhousearts.org or (703) 584-2911.

Jennifer Hecker - La Cage a Eau #2

2020
Flameworked borosilicated glass, welded steel and found objects
10 1/2 in x 15 in x 9 in
$1,000

Jennifer Hecker has an extensive and diverse exhibition record that includes solo exhibits, commissions, collaborative installations, public art projects, outdoor sculpture displays, adjudicated exhibitions, and permanent collections. She is a professor in the Department of Art at SUNY Brockport where she has taught since 1989.

“As a sculptor, materials are the vocabulary with which I speak. Glass is a relatively new material for me. Its transparency and fluidity suggest water, and I have been intrigued since 2013 with sculpting water and using it as a symbol of the transient, ephemeral nature of life itself.”

Jennifer Hecker - La Cage a Eau #3

2020
Flameworked borosilicated glass, welded steel and found objects
11 1/2 in x 16 in x 11 in
$1,000

Jennifer Hecker - La Cage a Eau #4

2020
Flameworked borosilicated glass, welded steel and found objects
12 in x 9 1/4 in x 13 1/2 in
$1,000

Michaela Borghese - Flow

2020
Bullseye glass, potmelted with a drop out
10 3/4 in x 10 3/4 in
$525

Michaela is well known for her life long passion for baking cakes and 18 years ago she started to explore another kind of baking, kilnformed glass, and this has become an additional passion. When not working in the studio or her kitchen, Michaela loves traveling and photography. Many of these captured memories become forever ‘framed”” in her glass art. Besides many classes at the Art Glass Center, Michaela has studied with nationally and internationally known glass artists locally and abroad. She became a studio artist at the Art Glass Center, Glen Echo in 2006.

“Nature plays a big part in my life, so I always like to incorporate it into my art work. What still fascinates me about glass, is that even with the most careful design, you never know exactly how a piece will turn out – when you open the kiln, you can always expect surprises.”

Teri Bailey - Seeking Home

2019
Bullseye glass, powder screening, kilnworking
18 in x 20 in x 6 in
$1,500

Teri Swinhart is a multimedia artist holding a BFA in Glass from The University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point and an MFA from The Ohio State University. She thrives in learning, pursuing opportunities to expand her understanding of material at institutions such as Penland School of Crafts, the Corning Museum of Glass, Pilchuck Glass School and the Chrysler Museum of Art. Teri currently lives and works in Washington D.C. as the Studio Coordinator for the Washington Glass School and the Director of WGS Contemporary.

“The forms for the “Sanctuary” and “Violence” series’ are constructed by precisely layering thin glass strands to imitate weaved textile patterns. The glass strands are lightly melted together and then heated until they slump over a hand-shaped mold. Each mold is uniquely carved out of a soft plaster mixture that is removed after firing, creating a negative space within the glass sculpture. In these works, I am exploring the relationship between the notion of “home” and the human body (i.e feeling at home in ourselves). The textiles and fabrics that accompany our growth play a large role in this relationship.”

Teri Bailey - Violence Among Growth

2020
Bullseye glass, fused and slumped
18 in x 17 in x 4 in
$2,500

Teri Bailey - Sanctuary Among Fragility

2019
Bullseye glass, fused and slumped
6 in x 7 in x 4 in
$1,200

David Barnes - Just Too Crazy

2020
Kiln-formed fused and cast art glass with custom steel stand
19 in x 19 in x 3 in
$975

“I have been a resident studio artist at the Workhouse Arts Center for over 12 years.

I am always trying to push my understanding of glass as an artistic medium and to transform an idea into a visual object. I like to present impressions and visions of contrast, irony, structure, movement, color and transparency. Usually I will think of a concept or see an interesting shape, natural or architectural, and then determine an effect in glass. I build these effects into glass components which are then fired, sawed up, layered and re-fired multiple times into a finished artwork.”

David Barnes - Once Broken, Now Made Whole

2020
Kiln-formed fused and cast art glass
12 in x 14 in x 1 in
$650

David Barnes - Mardi Gras

2018
Kiln-formed fused and cast art glass
19 in x 14 in x 2 in
$625

John Cowgill - Mingling Mannequins

2020
COE 90 Multiple Layer Fused Glass
10 in x 10 in x 1 in
$600

“I worked in various construction management roles for 45 years. During those years I was interested in art as a hobbyist and experimented with different media. I painted and exhibited in watercolor, worked with enamels and traditional stained glass.
I retired in 2013 and became interested in and experimented with glass fusing. I became fascinated with the challenges as well as the surprises that can occur through the fusing process. The fused glass pieces I create actually incorporates some of the interesting aspects of the other media I had worked in while posing new challenges specific to fused glass.

Through the patients of other artist willing to teach techniques I have developed a method of doing fused glass that I fine rewarding. I take studio classes as well as webinars from nationally recognized glass artists. I do not try to copy their work, but implement techniques into to my work.

All of the art pieces I create are unique original fused glass pieces. Pieces may look similar, but each piece is individually created with multiple layers of 90 COE glass incorporating various methods of depicting images. The images are created using pieces of glass, glass enamels, frit or stringers. Each individual piece will normally have been fired 3 or 4 times to temperatures between 1,240 to 1,320 degrees for each firing depending on the effect I am trying to achieve. Then each individual piece is stacked to form the finish piece and fired to 1,460-1,500. The final firing will take between 30-40 hours.”

John Cowgill - Waiting

2020
COE 90 Multiple Layer Fused Glass
10 in x 10 in x 1 in
$600

John Cowgill - Living on the Bay

2020
COE 90 Multiple Layer Fused Glass
10 in x 8 in x 1 in
$600

Ruth Gowell - Optical Curve #20

2020
Bullseye glass, kilnformed and slumped
10 1/2 in x 4 in x 2 1/2 in
$900

“I work in both woven fiber and kiln formed glass and I sometimes combine the two techniques. I have been exploring the use of “bubble glass” to distort pattern. In the Optical Curves Series I have many layers of patterned glass topped with a piece of bubble glass that distorts the patterned glass. Slumping the glass also creates additional distortion by stretching or compressing the bubbles.”

Julie Reilly - Can I Have Your Ear

2020
Stained Glass, Hand Cut Mosaic
15 1/4 in x 10 in x 1/2 in
NFS

 

“Rows of corn are quintessentially Midwestern. Every summer they emerge, creating bold, linear, balanced patterns across the middle of the country. The crops are steadfast and comforting. In this piece, I wanted to honor my Illinois roots with a close up. The composition focuses on a single stalk, pulling back the husk, showing the rows of kernels aesthetically lining up under the delicate but protective silk. From the broadest view of acres and acres, to the individual ear of corn you can hold in your hand, nature’s symmetry does not disappoint.

Composition aside, this mosaic’s title is a play on words. It has a duel message. Can I have your ear? Meaning, can you share, but also can you please listen.”

Julie Reilly - Dahlia (A Study In Magenta)

2020
Stained Glass, Hand Cut Mosaic
28 in x 14 3/4 in x 3/4 in
NFS

“Inspired from a photo I took of dahlia flower at the Chicago Botanic Gardens, I chose a tightly cropped composition reflective of my graphic designer background. I challenged myself to combine two opposing mediums… mosaics: hand cutting sheet glass, a material that is time consuming to manipulate, a material that has it’s own inherent color (why is there no magenta glass?) and drawing: colored pencils, the medium I was trained in, colors that I can blend and fairly effortlessly manipulate. My end goal was to recreate the breath-taking magenta color of the original flower. Matching nature’s hues – no matter the medium – is a lesson artists through ages have attempted. In the days to come, I’ll study the results, but for now I’ll express simple gratitude for flowers and art.”

Emily Pezzulich - Blue Hill Birches

2017
Fused Glass
21 1/2 in x 24 in x 3 in
$1,800

Emily Pezzulich has been working with glass in a variety of forms for more than 30 years. Her award-winning work is exhibited in galleries, shows and collections throughout the country.

“I love trees, and the flora and fauna that often surround them. Growing up in Kentucky, where there are trees and wildlife in abundance, wandering in the forest was always a blissful and restorative experience. I also love glass. With so many variables — color, texture, opacity, shape, and form — it’s the perfect medium to explore the endless wonders to be found in the wilderness. Using crushed glass, hand-made stringers, powder, rods and sheet glass, I create places I would like to be, both real and imagined. The many-layered “”Blue Hill Birches”” brings to mind an early-morning winter hike we took up in the Appalachian mountains — just as a snow storm blew in, but before the skies turned completely gray. Magic!”

Emily Pezzulich - Mountain Waterfall

2017
Fused Glass, with Vitrigraph cane pulls
27 in x 23 in x 16 in
$8,000

“Mountain Waterfall honors all the crystal blue cascades tumbling down from rocky hills and mountains everywhere. A free-standing piece that can be installed indoors or outdoors, “Mountain Waterfall” is created from vitrigraph cane and slices of cane, and is supported by natural stones found in the wilderness.”

Michele Rubin - Portals IV - Sheltering

2020
Kilnformed glass, coldworking techniques

8 in x 8 in x 10 in
$825

“A native of Washington, D.C., Michele began working in kiln-formed and lampworked glass in 2002 and has studied with many acclaimed glass artists in the US and Europe. In 2005 she established Trilogy Glass Art to explore and create both functional and non-functional glass art. For me, glass is a wondrous artistic tool. It is both the controller, and yet, controllable, setting limits, conditions, properties, which, when understood and applied successfully, allow me much latitude in form and possibility of expression. My art is message driven, not technique, providing me a way to comment, explore, recognize and challenge, without words. Success is achieving a dialogue with the viewer through my art.”

“The Portals series was begun in March.

“Sheltering” is, perhaps, best explained by my poem, “Sheltering:”

Without invitation
With no deference to Life
No regard for all that divides or unites
It came.
Oddly united, though painfully separate
We shelter from it, from each other
Yet remain exposed
We wait.”

Michele Rubin - Emerge

2020
Kilnformed glass, coldworking techniques
10 in x 6 in x 5 in
$865

“Emerge” is a Covid-19 related work. It looks beyond the pandemic to a hoped for rebirth/reemergence of life, promise, togetherness.

Stephen G. Sherwin - Towers of Babel

2018
Stained Glass, fired paint, zinc and lead
22 1/2 x 14 in x 11 1/2 in
$3,200

“There is an inherent balance between artistic expression and technical construction in stained glass. To master technique as well as excel in design is a perfect combination. As an artist, I welcome and embrace both aspects.

My work is often abstract and dimensional. I reference life experiences in an attempt to add meaning to my work. Family illness and death, as well as hope and joy have provided me with inspiration. I haven’t used art as a refuge during difficult and sad times in my life, but use these experiences to help give my work a voice.

I have always had a fascination with color, and color in glass with all its possibilities is one reason for choosing to work in this medium. Picking stained glass for a project is a major creative aspect in glass design. There is a seemingly endless selection of glass in all colors, types, and styles.”

Merrilee Harrigan - We Are All Beautiful

2020
Fused Glass, Silver
19 in x 19 in
$700

“Merrilee Harrigan is a glass and jewelry artist based in Washington DC. Her art includes fine jewelry, wall art and bowls and plates. She took her first fused glass class in 2003 and was immediately hooked on the beauty and creative process of glassmaking. She studied fused glass at Vitrum Studio, Bullseye Glass and the Art Glass Center at Glen Echo, and learned silversmithing at Silverworks at Glen Echo to craft silver settings to add to her fused glass jewelry. Her work has been exhibited

Merrilee found that her glass art added a life-affirming balance to her long career in environmental education; she lives her values by using solar panels to power her home studio.

“Creativity has been the common thread in my winding journey through life, and fused glass has proved to be the most exciting, engaging and joyous expression of my creative spirit. My glass is inspired by the brilliance and subtlety of color in glass, by the graceful and sometimes unexpected way that glass flows, and by the unending ways to create beauty and meaning through glass. The unique complexities of glass – the way it flows when heated, the chemical reactions between colors, the effect of air and metals in glass – ensure that there are always new things to learn and frontiers to explore. Crafting silver settings for my jewelry has added a new element of beauty to my glass jewelry.”

Merrilee Harrigan - Iris Garden

2020
Fused Glass
14 in x 14 in x 1/2 in
$600

“This multi-layered wall piece was made using a high temperature fuse with multiple firings, using sheet glass and frit. A sandblasted white glass piece forms a mat.”

Merrilee Harrigan - 4 Skinny Trees

2020
Fused Glass, Silver
13 in x 6 1/2 in
$250

“This piece take advantage of the chemical reactions between certain glasses and silver to create stunning effects.”

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